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Argument: The death penalty is barbaric and uncharacteristic of a decent society

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Revision as of 00:49, 1 July 2008 (edit)
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==Supporting quotations== ==Supporting quotations==
'''Rudolph J. Gerber, Judge of the Arizona State Court of Appeals.''' - To support the death penalty as sound social policy strikes me as grossly misguided. Not only does the death penalty not deter murder, it fosters a culture of brutality, risks international condemnation, and transforms our country into a brutal pariah.[http://freenet-homepage.de/dpinfo/judges.htm] '''Rudolph J. Gerber, Judge of the Arizona State Court of Appeals.''' - To support the death penalty as sound social policy strikes me as grossly misguided. Not only does the death penalty not deter murder, it fosters a culture of brutality, risks international condemnation, and transforms our country into a brutal pariah.[http://freenet-homepage.de/dpinfo/judges.htm]
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 +'''Abner Mikva, former Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C. (2002)''' - The more that variations on the theme are scrutinized, the more obvious it is that the real reason for executing people is the oldest of reasons: revenge, anger at the felon, the somewhat flawed interpretation of the biblical "Eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth." But if that is the real reason for remaining outside the fold of all Western nations who have reformed away the death penalty, then why don't we acknowledge this thorn in our legal system by its appropriate name? We should admit that we engage in legalized murder.[http://freenet-homepage.de/dpinfo/judges.htm]

Revision as of 01:34, 1 July 2008

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Supporting quotations

Rudolph J. Gerber, Judge of the Arizona State Court of Appeals. - To support the death penalty as sound social policy strikes me as grossly misguided. Not only does the death penalty not deter murder, it fosters a culture of brutality, risks international condemnation, and transforms our country into a brutal pariah.[1]


Abner Mikva, former Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C. (2002) - The more that variations on the theme are scrutinized, the more obvious it is that the real reason for executing people is the oldest of reasons: revenge, anger at the felon, the somewhat flawed interpretation of the biblical "Eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth." But if that is the real reason for remaining outside the fold of all Western nations who have reformed away the death penalty, then why don't we acknowledge this thorn in our legal system by its appropriate name? We should admit that we engage in legalized murder.[2]

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