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Debate: Myspace is your space

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*'''YouTube: "How Facebook Can Help In Your Career Search". Posted November 26, 2007.''' (Argument: It's a helpful way to find out information about companies on their Facebook profiles, for them to find out information about you, and for you to interact with employees) *'''YouTube: "How Facebook Can Help In Your Career Search". Posted November 26, 2007.''' (Argument: It's a helpful way to find out information about companies on their Facebook profiles, for them to find out information about you, and for you to interact with employees)
-**<YouTube>gcs8Cw97bwU</YouTube>+:<YouTube>gcs8Cw97bwU</YouTube>

Revision as of 00:15, 30 November 2007

Is it ethical for colleges, parents, or employers to get information about people from social networking websites?

Contents

Background and Context of Debate:

General access: Is the general level of access unethical or bad?

Yes

  • Members of social networking sites have significant powers to limit outsider access: There are many privacy settings on Facebook, for example. You can make it impossible for anyone to view your profile via legitimate avenues on Facebook without being inside you network of friends. Unless employers are hacking into profiles, this is sufficient to prevent employers from accessing profiles. As such, the user has the power to close their account from employer view. It is up to the user. This is important, since many prospective employees will want employers to view their profiles.


No

  • Over exposure of personal information creates a negative emotional and social reaction.
    • Danah Boyd, social networking scholar and blogger, said in 2006[1] - "privacy is an experience that people have, not a state of data....When people feel exposed or invaded, there's a privacy issue."



Employers: Should employers check social networking profiles of candidates?

Yes

  • Social networking sites provide employers a true impression of a candidate It is important that employers have good information on candidates so that they can judge most accurately whether a candidate is qualified. It is also important, given the problem of false resumes, for employers to have access to alternative sources of information for cross-referencing. But, equally important and relevant information regards the character of an individual, which social networking sites can help reveal. All of this information helps employers make better decisions and hire more effectively or "accurately".
  • Social networks forbid posting or spamming for commercial purposes but not the collection of information:
  • Many prospective employees want employers to view their profile.
  • Facebook can be used very effectively by candidates to showcase themselves to employers:
  • YouTube: "How Facebook Can Help In Your Career Search". Posted November 26, 2007. (Argument: It's a helpful way to find out information about companies on their Facebook profiles, for them to find out information about you, and for you to interact with employees)



No

  • Employer access to social networking sites can be financially damaging to candidates.
    • Tim DeMello, owner of the Internet company Ziggs said to CBS news in June 2006 - "I think some of these sites out there are going to be the most expensive free Web sites to their careers that they've ever seen."
  • Facebook policy demands a non-commercial use that should prevent employers from using the site for commercial purposes:
  • Facebook is not a true representation of a candidate, so employers shouldn't base their decisions off of it.
  • Many Facebook users do not know that employers are watching. If Facebook users were aware that employers were watching, they might have chosen to keep private their profile.
  • YouTube. November 6th, 2007. "Facebook Killed the Private Life"


Parents: Should parents be checking their child's profile?

Yes

  • Parents should try to engage with children on social networking sites. Youth spend a significant amount of time online these days. Barring the possibility that children will shift away from social networking sties, it is important that parents attempt to make a connection with their children on these sites. It is not necessary to think that parents will be snooping on their children on social networking site. There is legitimate room for bonding to take place, and it should be encouraged.
  • Encouraging proper cyber behavior is part of a modern education. This applies to teachers and parents. The only way to instruct proper cyber behavior, though, is to see what people and children are actually posting, in this context, on their personal profiles and with other users.


No

  • Trying to regulate children will actually make them more rebellious: As famous early 20th century psychiatrist Carl Jung said, "what you resist persists". The more parents try to constrain and direct children on social networking sites, the more they will seek to rebel and act outlandishly. By trying to bring attention to what is bad on social networking sties and in personal profiles, parents will actually bring greater attention to these things, and make children more conscious of the opportunity to take "nefarious" steps. This might have the reverse effect from what is intended by parents.



Colleges/applicants: Should colleges search applicant profiles on social networking sites?

Yes

  • Social network profiles are highly relevant to an applicant's merit for admissions: Admissions is all about judging the overall merit of a candidate. This is, more and more, a judgment of the life and character of a candidate, which is often outlined in stunning detail on social networking profiles (interests, activism, social-interactions...). Therefore, Facebook, Myspace, and other social networking profiles of candidates are highly relevant to an admissions officer, and justifies their approaching this information to make their judgement on the candidate.
  • Access to more information about candidates makes judgements more accurate and thus more fair overall. Giving the sensitivity to the admissions process in regard to fairness, this is very important.
  • Admish.com is a social networking site for college students and admissions officers. It inherently facilities interactions between students and college admissions officers, and with the express approval of both. It demonstrates that there is a value in social networking for applicant-college interactions, instead of it being something that should be feared as the proposition seems to suggest.


No

  • Admissions officers should not "snoop" around on profiles that are mostly irrelevant to the application process: It is unethical to snoop around on a personal profile of a candidate for information pertaining to an individual and their merit for entry into a University. This information is not necessarily relevant to the process at hand. Only relevant information should be viewed by admission's officers
  • Consent should be required from an applicant for an admissions officer to check out a profile: Consent is a significant element of the admissions process. A contract of sorts is entered between the candidate and college in which relevant information is supplied by the candidate. Relevant information can be checked through official third-party sources such as the SATs and high schools. This remains consensual because the applicant entered into a disclosure agreement with their high school and the preparers of the SATs, which gives authority to admissions officers to view relevant information about the applicant. But no such contract is established if an admissions officer "snoops" onto a profile. It thus breaks the mold of consent and acceptability in the admissions process.



University administrators: Should univ. admins. be checking profiles for misbehavior?

Yes

  • Universities have the right to look at profiles that are based on university emails: Facbook was initially a university-based system that required that profiles be based on valid university email addresses. These email addresses are, in part, owned by the university. Because universities have some authority over these emails they also have some juridiction on the social-networking profiles that use these email addresses.
    • Kathryn Goldman, director of judicial affairs at the University of Delaware, said that the university administration has the right to punish students based on incriminating evidence obtained from Facebook profiles, according to the University Newspaper in March of 2006.[2]



No

  • Administrators should not make charges based on information obtained from social-networking profiles: The problem is that this information and pictures do not clearly implicate the individual in any particular act.
    • Facebook Patrol. "Administrators shouldn't be snooping around Facebook". March 9th, 2006 - "Apparently, reasonable law doesn't apply to the university, because nobody has to be caught in the act anymore to be accused of something like underage drinking. And because there's no possible way students couldn't have been drinking, or the beer can couldn't have been digitally added to the photograph, or there wasn't beer in that can, guilty is the charge."
    • Facebook Patrol. "Administrators shouldn't be snooping around Facebook". March 9th, 2006 - "The Review is outraged by this policy, since it reveals how deep the university will pervade students' personal space to protect its sqeeky-clean image. The Facebook is an independent enterprise and was never intended to be under the jurisdiction of another monitor. In fact, The Facebook's Terms and Conditions states that users may not post content that it deems threatening, vulgar, harmful, etc. - not our university, not any university."



Organizations pro and con on this issue:

Yes



No

Activists/players: Who are the relevant individuals in this debate?

Yes

Click on the pencil icon and research and write arguments here



No

Click on the pencil icon and research and write arguments here




References:

External links

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